Bruce Robison

Cheatham Street Warehouse Presents

Bruce Robison

HalleyAnna

Fri. March 31, 2017

8:00 pm

$15.00 - $18.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 18 and over

Bruce Robison
Bruce Robison
Among the Lone Star State's finest tunesmiths, Bruce Robison has a knack for crafting deceptively straightforward songs around the universal struggles of modern life. His songs have a unique and significant personal touch, whether performed by someone else or himself. With many successes under his belt such as the Dixie Chicks No. 1 hit version of "Travelin Soldier", George Strait's "Wrapped", and "Angry All The Time" with Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, Bruce is a master at luring the audience into a vulnerable, captivating emotional core.

Bruce has been calling his music simply "country" for the past 25 years whether pop culture and media has deemed Willie Nelson or Florida Georgia Line the next greatest thing. His philosophy has always been to let the music speak for itself, and his projects are all informed by bringing it back to basics in this labor of love.

His songwriting philosophy is also readily apparent in his latest business venture, The Next Waltz. An oasis from the barrage of modern media, The Next Waltz experience is akin to a pre-technology era of sitting on a front porch talking and hanging with a great group of people. Like the acclaimed Food Network show Chopped, the artists get a secret basket of ingredients (great song, great studio, great band) and have to make something beautiful with what they've got because there aren't any digital safety nets to fix any mistakes or falsely make anything better than what it really is. The last line of defense against major publication agendas and the cultural mass of pop music, this artisan studio guarantees that if you put their songs in your iPod, you won't be sad when they come up.

"['Traveling Soldier'] really is a mini-movie, and Robison's visual lyrics still bring tears to the eyes of a lot of listeners with this song." - American Songwriter

"...in a couple decades of watching his gradual rise from an Austin nightclub and dancehall upstart to the likely future dean of Texas songwriters... [Robison]'s not content to simply coast on the coattails of past accomplishments. The creative spark still burns in him." - No Depression

"Bruce Robison is a prime example... [of] keeping the spirit of the traditional Texas troubadour alive." -Paste Magazine
HalleyAnna
HalleyAnna Finlay simply sings like her songs were stamped on her heart at birth. Evidence: The Country. HalleyAnna's superb debut collection swaggers ("So Heavy") and sways ("Fast Train") with effortless elegance. The album, which deftly spotlights her meeting point between Patsy Cline and Emmylou Harris, serves as a shining introduction to a skyward bound emerging talent. High watermarks – particularly, "Back in Your Arms Again" and "Peace Is Lonely, Love Is War"– already show HalleyAnna growing exponentially sharp as a songwriter.

"Experience is what happens when you don't get what you want, so songwriting makes me feel better," she says. "Any time I'd go through a heartache growing up, my dad would say, 'Well, you'll get a good song out of it.' Sure enough, I really did. You can't write every single song about how somebody broke your heart, so some of the stuff I've done is more serious. 'Back in Your Arms Again' may sound like a song about somebody who dumped you, but it has a much deeper, eternal, death-related theme about meeting in the next life."

For the last decade, HalleyAnna has honed her songwriting skills at Cheatham Street Warehouse, the legendary Central Texas listening room owned by her father, singer-songwriter Kent Finlay. She now leads the next generation of compelling writers who follow James McMurtry, Todd Snider, Bruce Robison and others who started out at Cheatham Street. "I grew up listening to people who play music in Texas," says the youthful singer-songwriter. "I really love the traditional stuff that's going on in East Nashville like Elizabeth Cook and Caitlin Rose and Hayes Carll and Slaid Cleaves here in Austin. They embody the same traditional country that I like."

All personify the literate storytelling so identified with the Texas music tradition and HalleyAnna has put her creative writing studies to good use following their footsteps. Look for further proof one her sophomore effort (due in early 2013). Americana all-star Bill Chambers (Kasey's father) produced the collection. "Working with Bill is so easy and great," HalleyAnna says. "Bill came up and was here for the summer touring with Kasey and he had about a week window to make a record with me. He brought this really nice microphone that Kasey used on 'The Captain' and 'Barricades and Brickwalls' and we did vocals pretty much live. We cut the album in five days in the Wood Shed in San Marcos."

Brian T. Atkinson, author of I'll Be Here in the Morning: The Songwriting Legacy of Townes Van Zandt
Photo by Bill Sallans
Venue Information:
Cheatham Street Warehouse
119 Cheatham Street
San Marcos, TX, 78666
http://www.cheathamstreet.com/